(Not) Gentle on His Mind (Part 2)

I previously noted that Glen Campbell’s 3 children from his second marriage were contesting his will which he signed in 2006. The will omitted them, likely due to their supporting their mother during her divorce from Campbell and later suing him over the publishing rights she received in the settlement. His 2001 will also omitted them. The children recently dropped their lawsuit.

A few points:

1. The lawsuit would have been difficult to win because Campbell made both wills long before he went public with his Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

2. Campbell’s estate was recently valued at $1.2 million which is way less than the original estimate of $50 million.

3. If the omitted children were successful in challenging Campbell’s estate plan, they would have inherited $100K each tops.

4. The money for recording artists is in the writing and publishing not the performing. Campbell generally performed songs written by others.

5. Three divorces, 8 children, and years of cocaine use are never conducive to accumulating wealth.

Photo credit:  Larry McCormack/The Tennessean

License:  Fair Use/Education (from linked article)

Mini-Me and Maximum Bill

Verne Troyer is the actor famous for playing Mini-Me in the Austin Powers movies. He committed suicide by alcohol poisoning in April. After ingesting the alcohol, he called 911 and told dispatchers he wanted to die. He was rushed to the hospital but died 3 weeks later. He left an estate valued at $150K. Just recently the hospital which treated him filed a claim against his estate for $360K.

Three small points:

1. In Ohio, a creditor has six months from the date of death to file a claim for payment against the estate. If the claim is not made, the estate does not have to pay the debt.

2. Debts must be paid before the beneficiaries receive any assets. Troyer’s heirs will not receive anything from his estate.

3. If there are insufficient assets to pay debts, the debts die with the decedent. The heirs are not responsible for them.

4. No snark when someone commits suicide.

Photo Credit:  REX/Shutterstock 

License:  Fair Use/Education (from linked article)

If It Is Not One Thing, It Is Something Else

 

Your chances of death rated by activity. Climbing in the Himalayas is definitely a death wish, as is base jumping (and its cousin, wing suit flying). As a cyclist, I am bummed out to see the somewhat high risk of death for cycling.

Be careful out there. And prepare a will.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source:  besthealthcaredegress.com
License:  Fair Use/Education

TML Again

I subbed for Paul Daugherty’s The Morning Line blog in the Cincinnati Enquirer again today. I touched on some recent sports deaths and firings, the basketball jerseys honoring Prince, and reviewed my favorite book of the year. I hope you enjoy it.

 

Photo Credit:  Unknown

License:  Fair Use/Education (from linked article)

 

 

 

Tasered and Confused

A local story has a probate court angle. The City of Cincinnati has agreed to settle a lawsuit brought by an 11 year old shoplifter who was tasered after running from an off duty police officer. The young girl, who had been caught and warned previously for stealing from the same store, had $53 of stolen merchandise on her. She will receive $220,000 from the city and $20,000 from Kroger for the indignity of being tasered.

Several points and one prediction:

1. Because the girl is a minor, the settlement will be subject to probate court supervision until she turns 18.

2. Funds may only be spent with the approval of the probate court and then only for her mental health to overcome the trauma of being tasered.

3. She will have unrestricted access to the funds when she turns 18.

4. Call it more than a hunch that the number of shoplifting incidents at Kroger without repercussions will increase dramatically.

Photo Credit:  Albert Cesare/Cincinnati Enquirer

License:  Fair Use/Education (from linked article)

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